Research for sexual health-Centre for Sexual Health Research | Psychology | University of Southampton

The mission of the Centre is to encourage, develop and conduct high quality local, national and international inter-disciplinary sexual health research to generate new knowledge and guidance for programme development and policy formulation. The CSHR approach is based on the view that societal contexts have a major bearing on sexual health through legislation, policy, education and services. Research conducted at the CSHR aims to improve understanding of the barriers to, and opportunities for, improved sexual health and to generate theories and knowledge to assist the development of effective programmes and interventions to the promotion of sexual and reproductive health both in the UK and abroad. Our research. Research centres.

Research for sexual health

Since that time, it has received Research for sexual health fair amount of attention in both the scientific and nonscientific e. Yarber Professorship, both awarded to the first author. By sharing an approach that has rarely been discussed in the sexual health Bendon lingerie, our aim is to provide sexual health researchers with an understanding, and examples, of a participatory research framework. Arch Sex Behav. Community-oriented network of this research and advocacy organization.

Earring gay. What we will fund

GottliebAnn E. Sexual health basics By Mayo Clinic Staff. Sexual practices Research for sexual health heterosexual men may differ between female sex workers and casual partners. To subscribe to HRP News. This study aimed ffor see if sex with an overseas partner was a risk factor for men as well. Get updates. Make sure your teen understands that emergency contraception must be started as soon as possible after unprotected intercourse. SH Agent-based modelling study of antimicrobial-resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae transmission in men who have sex jealth men: towards individualised diagnosis and treatment Adam K. Teens Research for sexual health sex can be a risky combination. Use the online submission system to send us your manuscript. Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn. Segurado, Gwenda Hughes.

In the context of a study seeking a broad interpretation of the health implications of cruising, and when faced with methodological challenges, the researchers found these principles to provide invaluable guidance.

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We are actively canvasing for research in a number of fields which we feel are in need of further research. We would also want to encourage young researchers to try out their ideas before going to large funding bodies. STIRF has funded a number of successful research projects that have been presented in prestigious national and international meetings and published in reputable international scientific journals.

Useful websites providing reliable and accurate information of issues relating to sexual health and HIV. There are many areas of knowledge that will help the sexual wellbeing of individuals that are waiting to be explored. STIRF aims to kickstart funding to young researchers asking the right questions. It affects everyone but comparatively little is spent on research.

There are huge areas of knowledge that will help the sexual wellbeing of individuals, directly or indirectly, that are waiting to be explored. Our aim is to provide funding to kickstart that research. Measuring patient experience and outcome in health care settings on receiving care after sexual violence: a systematic review Project number: This project was completed in March Skip to content What we will fund We are actively canvasing for research in a number of fields which we feel are in need of further research.

Research Portfolio STIRF has funded a number of successful research projects that have been presented in prestigious national and international meetings and published in reputable international scientific journals. Useful Links Useful websites providing reliable and accurate information of issues relating to sexual health and HIV. What we are about There are many areas of knowledge that will help the sexual wellbeing of individuals that are waiting to be explored.

Sexual health is important for healthy living It affects everyone but comparatively little is spent on research.

Funding high quality research There are huge areas of knowledge that will help the sexual wellbeing of individuals, directly or indirectly, that are waiting to be explored.

Links providing reliable and accurate info on issues relating to sexual health. Okay, thank you.

This paper describes the World Health Organization Gonococcal Antimicrobial Surveillance Program WHO GASP data from 67 countries in —16 and confirmed gonorrhoea treatment failures with ceftriaxone with or without azithromycin or doxycycline, highlights the urgent need for molecular AMR surveillance and describes essential international collaborative actions and research efforts. This study reviewed existing work on specific DNA sequences and their link to resistance in Neisseria gonorrhoeae , and evaluated these sequences to identify accurate markers of resistance for two treatments of gonorrhoea. Healthy Lifestyle Sexual health. Article: Metoidioplasty. Give today. But could it also be taking our memories?

Research for sexual health

Research for sexual health

Research for sexual health

Research for sexual health

Research for sexual health

Research for sexual health. Online Early

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STIRF – Research on Sexual Health

In the context of a study seeking a broad interpretation of the health implications of cruising, and when faced with methodological challenges, the researchers found these principles to provide invaluable guidance. A review of the research process is offered and the manner in which the principles of community-based participatory research were operationalized for this study is described. It necessitates that researchers acknowledge the diverse range of sexual norms, values, and behaviors of particular communities and commit to exploring, discussing, and debating topics related to the manner in which individuals and groups construct their sexual lives.

The research process is further facilitated if researchers have informed insights and frameworks that help to structure the study and its research questions, the methods used to conduct the study, and the manner in which findings are disseminated to the field and digested by community members themselves. For over a decade, sexual health researchers and practitioners dedicated to improving the sexual health of gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with men have focused their work largely on the need to reduce the incidence of Human Immunodeficiency Virus HIV infection.

Given the magnitude of the epidemic, and the extent to which it has challenged social structures and public health systems, a concentration on understanding its behavioral, social, and cultural correlates has been essential. One outcome of the intense focus on HIV by medical, behavioral, and social scientists is that much of the contemporary sexual health knowledge related to these men has been constructed in the context of this particular disease.

This has resulted in a body of literature about these communities that is very problem-oriented; it is characterized largely by studies that have examined the correlates of behaviors and societal factors associated with the potential for HIV transmission to occur.

This particular pandemic has created a need for researchers to not only explore the wide range of sexual attitudes and behaviors that occur within these communities, but also to interact directly with community members and practitioners to design and conduct research.

Through engaging community members in the research process, sexual health researchers may realize the limitations of a problem-focused research agenda, even within the context of disease-focused research. We also found it necessary to develop and conduct the study, and disseminate its findings, by using participatory research methods that supported this approach to sexual health.

This paper will describe the participatory approach and methods that were used for this study on campus cruising. We are confident that this approach, and the manner in which we operationalized its tenets to inform the research methods, supported our ability to gain a better understanding of cruising and its health implications.

By sharing an approach that has rarely been discussed in the sexual health literature, our aim is to provide sexual health researchers with an understanding, and examples, of a participatory research framework.

It also provides philosophies that help to overcome some of the methodological challenges of such work and offers valuable insights concerning the way that such research is disseminated throughout the field and digested by members of the communities under study. We will provide an overview of campus cruising and the reasons that this phenomenon necessitated a participatory research approach. In addition, we will offer a description of the participatory framework used to conduct the study and the manner in which this framework was operationalized.

Some of the limitations of a participatory approach to sexual health research will also be discussed. Cruising can be described as a ritualistic pattern of behaviors associated with seeking, and interacting sexually with, other individuals. The college campus offers multiple public and semipublic spaces in which men are able to cruise and engage in sexual activities with one another.

Little scientific literature has addressed cruising that occurs in campus-specific spaces. The exploration of cruising, as it occurs in other venues, has existed on the fringe of sex research for several decades, beginning with the landmark study by Humphreys , the first scientific investigation of cruising for sex among men.

Since that time, it has received a fair amount of attention in both the scientific and nonscientific e. In public health research, cruising has primarily been studied for its potential to challenge the physical health of its participants.

Like much of the other sexual health research over the past decade, this work has been highly problem-focused and concentrated on factors associated with the transmission of HIV and other diseases. As a result, much of the literature about cruising would characterize it only as negatively contributing to sexual health. Little is actually known about the role that cruising plays in the lives of men who participate in it and whether cruising has any health protective characteristics.

Further, in the context of campus cruising and among a generation of men who have been regularly exposed to warnings about HIV risk, virtually nothing is known about the reasons that men choose to cruise, how they make decisions about sexual behaviors in the cruising venue, and the components of cruising that are positively reinforcing. To do so required research methods that facilitated our ability to understand cruising from the perspective of those who cruise. This was necessary for two reasons, one methodological and the other philosophical.

Cruising on college campuses is a phenomenon that, by definition, requires that its participants are able to retain their anonymity and that its venues, at least the extent to which they are socially constructed as sexual spaces, are not openly acknowledged among the general campus community. As a result, we perceived there to be significant methodological challenges associated with conducting this study, particularly in terms of activities such as participant recruitment.

Addressing such challenges required an innovative methodological approach. Given the limited literature in this area, we were faced with developing the framework for the study and the research questions without the benefit of a solid knowledge base on the topic. To accomplish this, we operationalized and applied a set of guiding principles that have been developed by public health researchers. These principles provided guidance helpful to designing and conducting the study and disseminating its findings.

To better articulate the manner in which the principles were operationalized for our exploration of campus cruising study, a brief overview of the study and its findings will be presented.

Three primary sexual health questions were considered in the campus cruising study. These included. Are the characteristics of campus cruising venues, and the nature of sexual behaviors that occur in these venues, likely to facilitate increased or decreased risk for health issues like sexually transmitted diseases and HIV infection? To what extent do cruising behaviors contribute, both positively and negatively, to the mental health of cruising participants?

Does cruising make contributions, both negative and positive, to the social well-being of its participants? Preliminary insights gained from the cruisers who partnered with us in this study, as will be explained later, led us to believe that the actual risk for HIV transmission risk specific to campus cruising was quite low.

From a social justice perspective, this study was relevant given that public health issues, such as HIV, tend to influence legal policies and other social standards. It was, and continues to be, our view that policies based on science that is limited in its understanding of behaviors and their consequences are inappropriate and we felt it necessary to further develop the understanding of this phenomenon. Another goal of the study was to gain insights that would be beneficial to campus-based health care providers, student service professionals, and other campus officials working to improve the quality of life for gay, bisexual, and other men questioning and exploring their sexual orientation while in college.

Many college campuses possess a multitude of such resources, and with cruising appearing to be quite frequent on many campuses Hoover, , the ability to use the study findings to educate these individuals about cruising was of interest.

Lastly, if study findings had indicated that campus cruising did, in fact, place men at high risk for HIV or other infections, or that cruising was associated with psychological or social distress, the study would provide data that could be used to develop health-promoting interventions.

Thirty adult men who self-identified as current or past campus cruisers participated in the study. The mixed methods design included collecting data using both individual in-depth interviews and a paper—pencil sexual behavior inventory. Findings suggested that there were both positive and negative implications for the physical health of the cruisers. Also identified were both positive and negative implications for the mental health of cruisers.

For others, there appeared to be clear associations between cruising and negative impacts on psychological well-being. For example, several participants described cruising-related behaviors associated with negative, and somewhat intense, perceptions of their bodies.

There were also both positive and negative impacts on the social well-being of cruisers. Collectively, the findings of the study supported the study goals and provided rich answers to the research questions. Following is a description of the manner in which these principles were operationalized and examples of how their use benefited, and in some instances challenged, the campus cruising study.

The notion of participatory research frameworks is not new. As a result, there are similar principles, guidelines, and recommendations for conducting community-based participatory research that exist in, and guide the work of, multiple academic disciplines. However, the principles applied to this study emerged from, and are specific to, the field of public health.

According to Minkler and Wallerstein, this has resulted in alternative research approaches that stress community partnership and action for social change and reductions in health disparities as essential components of the research process. Israel et al. These are.

CBPR integrates and achieves a balance between research and action for the mutual benefit of all partners. CBPR emphasizes local relevance of public health problems and ecological perspectives that recognize and attend to the multiple determinants of health and disease.

CBPR disseminates findings and knowledge gained to all partners and involves all partners in the dissemination process. This may offer researchers with a diversity of insightful views as to the social and cultural relevance of behaviors and values that is different from the insights to be gained by our existing knowledge base. Such insights may be particularly beneficial during the process of developing research questions and ensuring that the purpose of the study is consistent with the needs, concerns, and desires of those in the community of interest.

These principles may be of significant benefit when overcoming or avoiding methodological challenges in sexual health research. For example, community members, as active research partners, can provide guidance on issues related to participant recruitment, question development, and data collection strategies.

Given their familiarity with the social and cultural norms of the community under study, such guidance can help researchers to avoid protocols and tools that are insensitive, inappropriate, or otherwise ineffective. The principles of CBPR are fairly ambiguous in nature in that they are highly philosophical and do not provide researchers with specific information as to how they should be applied in an actual study.

In our cruising study, the principles of CBPR were operationalized in the context of, and in order to increase their utility for, a study on sexual health. As Israel et al. In this study, we applied eight of the nine principles at particular points in the research process. Following is a description of how these eight principles were operationalized and applied to the campus cruising study. Table II provides specific examples of the manner in which certain principles were operationalized during particular phases of the study.

Identifying socially constructed symbols, values, and characteristics of cruising community. Developing and using data collection protocols that were sensitive to community strengths related to a need for secrecy. Open discussions with community members and debriefing with study participants about ecological goals of study. Open discussions with participants about their perceived benefits of study participation and involvement in analysis.

Community has been characterized by the existence of common symbol systems, shared norms, and common interests Israel et al. The notion of community can also be applied to groups whose members share a common behavioral characteristic, as was the case with this study. We applied this principle by conceptualizing men who cruise on college campuses as a community. We learned that cruisers acknowledged their identity with this community and that they actually drew upon its symbols and norms to recognize one another.

Cruising, and its dependence upon its participants to remain somewhat anonymous, may seem inconsistent with this notion. However, men who partnered with us to conduct this study described unique elements of cruising that simultaneously enabled an individual to be both anonymous and recognizable as a member of the cruising community. Once the community of interest has been defined, the principles of CBPR hold that researchers actively take steps to conduct the study in a collaborative and equitable manner with members of that community.

The ensuing discussions between these men and the researchers led to the decision to conduct this study. Being approached by these men was a critical event in the research process.

Prior to this, we had briefly discussed the notion of conducting a study on campus cruising and had discussed utilizing the principles of CBPR to do so. The participatory nature of the principles was actually the component that initially challenged us as we considered using this approach.

Once we realized the potential for engaging with the cruisers throughout the remainder of the study, it became apparent that a CBPR approach could be implemented and steps were taken to operationalize the principles of CBPR throughout the other phases of the study.

To operationalize this principle during the phase of research question development, the researchers and the cruisers collaborated during a series of meetings to conduct a review of the cruising literature. As a result of these activities, and in-depth discussions with the cruisers about the role that cruising played in their lives, we developed a broad list of research questions that both partners the researchers and the cruisers believed were appropriate, important, and that, if answered, would ultimately be supportive of the sexual health needs of men who cruise.

In addition to the original cruisers that helped design the study, two other men became involved with the study as research assistants and helped to facilitate participant recruitment.

Their contributions were beyond those typical of participants involved in a snowball recruitment approach. Given their familiarity with the cruising venues and the norms of interaction within those venues, these men were able to recruit not only those individuals with whom they were personally acquainted, but also men that they did not know but that they were able to recognize as cruisers on the basis of their behaviors in the cruising venues.

We also worked collaboratively with cruisers during data analysis, in planning for dissemination, and in the actual development of manuscripts and presentations.

Research for sexual health