Model railroad control software-DCC Software - DCCWiki

There are freely available applications and tools as well as commercial applications. Regardless, you still need to connect your computer to your DCC layout before you can use any of these tools. Generally, you connect your computer to the layout via a device called a computer interface using your throttle network that is a part of your DCC system Digitrax , Lenz. For example, if you were using a Digitrax system, you connect to the LocoNet through a Locobuffer. Other systems dispense with the command station altogether and the computer connects directly to a special booster SPROG, Hornby eLink.

Model railroad control software

If you use an NCE Power Pro system, you can backup and restore all of the setup and operational parameters held in the command station. For example, you can implement multi-train operations with automated collision avoidance, prototypical signal networks, and grade crossings that run fully automatically, just like Model railroad control software real thing. This guide shows the first basic steps and contexts for softwars successful start with Rocrail. And Happy Railroading!!! Benelux: It was based around the TMS four-bit microprocessor. We can help!!!

Bmi calculator for teens. Rocrail - Quick-Start

Members of our user's group receive a complimentary subscription. Your model railroading will never be the same!!! The agreement ends the dispute, and gives everybody involved a way Model railroad control software move forward. After you download and install a program onto your phone, sogtware can connect it wirelessly to your computer running JMRI, which in turn will run your layout. The pages are simple HTML, and users Model railroad control software encouraged to add missing information. Possibility to add text, platforms and buildings to the switchboard. Hardware Modules - Descriptions, block diagrams, and images of our railrpad modules. If you're a member of our User's Group, be Moddl to keep up-to-date on the latest developments in our continually expanding product line see "Product News". And Happy Railroading!!! All prices are in USD. This is a victory for JMRI and open-source software in general. Online Technical Support - How to get the fastest technical support. Modification of definitions possible at all times and directly visible. The current web browsers running on these devices are able to manage the resources and woftware needed to replace physical throttles.

The JMRI project is building tools for model railroad computer control.

  • For example, automatic block control avoids collisions and you control which train is driving manually or fully automatically according to a selected route.
  • The JMRI project is building tools for model railroad computer control.

Welcome to CTI Electronics. If you're a member of our User's Group, be sure to keep up-to-date on the latest developments in our continually expanding product line see "Product News". Visit often to check out our helpful "Tip-of-the-Week" feature. In addition to our website, we publish a semi-annual newsletter, the "Interface" , with the latest news in the rapidly emerging area of model railroad computer control.

Members of our user's group receive a complimentary subscription. If you're not yet a member, but would like to keep up-to-date in this exciting new aspect of the hobby, simply drop us an E-Mail at interface cti-electronics.

We'd be happy to send you a free subscription. Welcome to CTI. And Happy Railroading!!! It has revolutionized the way we learn, work, and play. The result is a level of performance and prototypical realism never before imaginable. Your model railroading will never be the same!!! FAQS - Answers to some frequently asked questions. Hardware Modules - Descriptions, block diagrams, and images of our control modules. Control Software - An overview of our model railroad control software.

Catalog - Our product line, price list, and ordering information. Buy It Now!!! User Information and Support: Product News - Late breaking news on hardware releases, software updates, etc. Software Downloads - Free software!!! Application Notes - Helpful real-world applications examples. Online Technical Support - How to get the fastest technical support.

Software Developers - Want to develop your own model railroad control software? We can help!!! All rights reserved.

For example, automatic block control avoids collisions and you control which train is driving manually or fully automatically according to a selected route. All rights reserved. Software Downloads - Free software!!! One of our members has spent the past four years in the Federal Courts defending our right to continue against an individual who has attacked us with bogus patent threats, cybersquatting, copyright infringement and other illegal acts. This is a victory for JMRI and open-source software in general. This page was last updated October 5,

Model railroad control software

Model railroad control software

Model railroad control software

Model railroad control software. JMRI at NMRA 2016 Convention

Control Your Locos From a Web Browser - computer, smartphone or tablet Now, you can control your layout directly from your computer, smartphone or tablet, without the need to download and install any application.

The current web browsers running on these devices are able to manage the resources and features needed to replace physical throttles.

It has lots of information, including overviews and window-specific information. The pages are simple HTML, and users are encouraged to add missing information. The Help information is available online via either the Index or Table of Contents.

This tool lets you import your physical layout design from XTrkCad directly into JMRI so you can easily set up controls for the layout you've built. Automagically created from the current DecoderPro definitions, it provides easy access to all sorts of information about decoders. One of our members has spent the past four years in the Federal Courts defending our right to continue against an individual who has attacked us with bogus patent threats, cybersquatting, copyright infringement and other illegal acts.

We are extremely pleased to announce that this case has now been settled. The agreement ends the dispute, and gives everybody involved a way to move forward. This is a victory for JMRI and open-source software in general. JMRI won for it's community, it's use of Java technology to empower people all over the world to contribute, and for the impact it's had. Thanks and congratulations to all who contributed!

Additional information on copyright, trademarks and licenses is linked here. Site hosted by: Simply Hosting site status page. What is JMRI? Our interactive control panel puts you in charge at a Centralized Traffic Control center. You can dispatch trains, configure routes, and assign blocks, all with a single click of the mouse. And with CTI, you'll always be up to date on what's happening across your layout, as you monitor the flow of rail traffic via an interactive track schematic , displayed in full color on your PC screen, and updated automatically in real-time to portray train locations, turnout positions, block assignments, etc.

But interactive control is just the beginning. Your CTI system can also be instructed to perform any sequence of control operations automatically. Using "TCL" the Train Control Language , CTI's innovative new programming language designed especially for model railroading, you can teach your PC to run any part of your railroad with no operator intervention.

Model Railroad Computer Control with TrainController™

A number of control systems are available to operate locomotives on model railways. Some digital control systems provide the ability to independently control all aspects of operating a model railway using a minimum of wiring, the rails themselves can be the only wiring required. Other systems are wireless. Control is achieved by sending a digital signal as well as power down the rails or wirelessly.

These digital signals can control all aspects of the model trains and accessories, including signals, turnouts , lighting, level crossings , cranes, turntables, etc. Constant power is supplied to the track and digital signals are sent which require electronic decoders to be fitted to locomotives and other devices to interpret the commands. Controllers manage operation of locomotives with buttons for additional model features such as lighting and sound.

Central units also have connections for additional controllers and accessory switch boxes, as well as connections for computer control and interfaces with other digital controllers. Boosters are connected to the central unit by special cables that relay the digital commands. Locomotive decoders are small electronic circuits fitted inside locomotives to interpret the digital signals and provide individual control.

Although all active decoders receive commands, only the addressed decoder will respond. Accessory decoders are used to control devices which are fixed in position, such as turnouts, signals, and level crossings.

Since the devices do not move, stationary decoders can be mounted under the layout, and therefore can be significantly larger than locomotive decoders. Accessory decoders can receive their signals from an accessory data bus or from the track. Basic locomotive decoders provide control of speed and direction while supplemental function decoders control headlights, ditch lights, or movable non-traction components such as remote-controlled pantographs.

Sound decoders play pre-recorded sound effects which may be synchronised with the locomotive speed, so that as a diesel locomotive starts from standstill, the sound decoder plays sounds of a diesel engine starting up. Sound decoders for steam locomotives can play "chuff" sounds synchronised with the driving wheels.

Some decoders have all three functions—locomotive control, sound effects, and function control, in a single circuit. In some automated systems, the central unit needs to know when trains reach their destination or a certain point. This information is detected by a sensor, such as an infrared device placed between the tracks, a reed switch or a device which senses current draw in an isolated section of track. Feedback relays an electrical signal from the sensor hardware back to the digital central unit.

The central unit can then issue commands appropriate for the specific sensor, such as triggering a signal, or level crossing. Some central units allow connection to a computer, and a program can then fully automatically control all model train movements and accessories.

This facility is particularly useful for display layouts. Programs have been developed allowing mobile devices to be used as controllers, which also requires the central unit to be connected to a computer. Equipped with DCC, locomotives on the same electrical section of track can be independently controlled.

While DCC is only one of several alternative systems for digital model train control, it is often misinterpreted to be a generic term for such systems. Several major manufacturers offer DCC systems. Factory installed decoders have been offered in H0 scale , two-rail 0 scale , 3-rail 0 gauge, Gauge 1 , and three-rail Standard Gauge models. DCS is predominantly used in three-rail O gauge.

DCS uses proprietary command codes and transmission technology covered under US patent 6,, DCS command signals are transmitted at Engines with either system can be operated simultaneously as long as both command control units are installed on the track. Direct WiFi Control DWiC is an emerging technology for model railway control utilizing the concept of "the internet of things". The availability of miniature web server modules in led to the formation of a DWiC Working group to explore the possibility of using this technology in model railways.

WiFi technology is well established and proven. DWiC does not use any model rail specific items such as command stations and boosters and so is much lower in cost. This technology is also useful outside the model rail world as a DWiC controller could open a garage door or remotely turn on sprinklers. The DWiC controller has a web page loaded on board tailored to the particular "item" - loco, accessory etc. It consisted of a full system including locomotive decoders based on a Motorola chip , central control, a computer interface, turnout decoders, digital relays and s88 feedback modules.

Apart from the locomotive decoders and central units, all the other system components were identical between 3-rail and 2-rail versions. Technically Selectrix differs from competing bus systems by being fully synchronized and bi-directional. The same data bus protocol and data buses are shared by the rolling stock, accessories and feedback information. It was introduced exclusively in Lionel trains in Beginning in , Lionel offered licenses to other manufacturers. Legacy Control System Legacy is Lionel's current electronic control system.

Legacy is backwards compatible with all TMCC decoder equipped engines. The command codes for these additional features differ from the DCC command codes. Lionel has not published or licensed access to the Legacy specific command codes. Hornby Zero 1 was a forerunner to the modern digital model railway control system, developed by Hornby in the late s.

It was based around the TMS four-bit microprocessor. The Zero 1 system offered simultaneous control of up to 16 locomotives and 99 accessories. The decoder module in the locomotive would switch either the positive or the negative half-cycle of the square wave to the motor according to the desired direction of travel. During the transmission of the control word, it would remain switched off.

Speed control was achieved by pulse-width modulation , varying the width of the portion of the half-cycle, which was switched in 14 steps. This caused the motor to be extremely noisy and rough. Fine control of a locomotive at low speed was also difficult, partly due to the rough running, partly due to the inherent coarseness of a step speed scale, and partly because there was a significant delay between operator input to the controller and response from the locomotive.

Locomotives fitted with a Zero 1 decoder according to Hornby's instructions could not be used on conventional systems, making it difficult to run locomotives across multiple layouts. It was possible to include a miniature DPDT switch in the installation to enable the Zero 1 decoder to be switched out for use on a conventional system.

Control of points and other accessories was available in a very simple manner. For solenoid-operated accessories e.

Each output could be configured either for burst operation or continuous output, for use with solenoids or lights respectively. Accessories were switched by entering a numeric code on the controller. Up to 99 accessories could be controlled. Accessories based around motors rather than solenoids or lights, such as turntables, could be fitted with a locomotive module and controlled in the same manner as a locomotive.

While the main master controller unit was discontinued in , the system is very reliable, the basic s keyboard design being the main problem on older badly stored master units. Loco modules were available in two types. The system is still used today by many modellers. Unfortunately it was only produced for about 18 months when Airfix went into receivership and the concept was dropped.

It was introduced late s. Digitrack is one of the first generation digital model railway control system developed and marketed by Chuck Balmer and Dick Robbins in The width and timing of the pulse determined speed and direction. CTC system offered simultaneous control of up to 16 locomotives. A receiver mounted in each locomotive is programmed to respond to only one of the 16 pulses. The receiver determines the speed and direction information from that specific pulse.

The receiver is essentially a transistor throttle built right into the locomotive. The command station is not expandable beyond 16 channels.

CTC was completely compatible with the Digitrack receivers, as it was an improved and cost reduced version of the Digitrack It was presented as a 'build it yourself' project, commercial versions would appear as well.

It was introduced in the late s. PMP system offered simultaneous control of up to locomotives. It was based CTC Digital model railway control systems are often connected with an external computer where special software for controlling the train layout is running.

Introduced in late , the RailMaster is a model railway control software package by Hornby. The software connects to the Hornby Elite DCC controller or the later eLink controller, which is an interface between the laptop or PC which runs RailMaster and the layout and allows for the controls of trains, points, signals, turntables and uncouplers from a single screen.

Although usable with a normal mouse, it has been optimised for touch-screen PCs where you just touch a point, a signal or slide a locomotive throttle. The eLink unit comes with RailMaster as one package and the latter is regularly, and automatically, updated from Hornby itself. Users can run trains directly from their computer or have it run the trains automatically. Some of the trains can be set to run automatically allowing manual control for others.

JMRI is an open source project that can control a model layout including accessories from a computer. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. This article has multiple issues. Please help improve it or discuss these issues on the talk page.

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Model railroad control software

Model railroad control software