Amateur antenna cable-Ham radio connectors & cables at DX Engineering

Welcome to the Coax Cable for Antennas page. Here, you'll find links for low loss Coax Cable for antennas covering hf-vhf-uhf. Amateur radio Coax Cable suppliers. England No. Coax Cable Home Coax Cable.

Amateur antenna cable

Amateur antenna cable

Amateur antenna cable

Amateur antenna cable

Your web browser appears to be out of date. Amateur Radio transceivers are designed to work with an impedance of 50 ohms, so you Amateur antenna cable use 50 ohm coax, or find a way to convert the to ohm impedance of ladder line to 50 ohms. The Very Best. There is also insulating material between the center conductor Amateur antenna cable the shield. Find A Class Use our class locator to find a class offered in your local area. Items in Cart 0. It's attenuations are

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Sma Male Antenna. The range of these antennas starts at 30 megahertz with a maximum potential for megahertz. This balun has the Amateur antenna cable to connect the wire to. But are 75 Ohm cables really a good bet? Impedance: 50 Ohm. This article explores the good and bad Bonde sex 75 Ohm coax cable. Band see all. Just a quick note to tell you the [Slim Jim] antenna was installed and worked extremely well. Henry, W5GEN. Anyway, just curious as to Amateur antenna cable to set up an antenna ground.

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  • A common question that I receive is what type of coax cable should I use for my J-Pole antenna.
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Welcome to the Coax Cable for Antennas page. Here, you'll find links for low loss Coax Cable for antennas covering hf-vhf-uhf. Amateur radio Coax Cable suppliers. England No. Coax Cable Home Coax Cable. Add to basket view info. This cable grants exceptional mechanical properties along with outstanding electrical features.

It's attenuations are This is the only cable that should be used for extending antenna connections on high-frequency devices, e. This cable delivers exceptional mechanical features and electrical properties. Frequency 11 GHzImpedance 50 ohmsCapacitance RG8 mini coax m Drum of Mini-8 50 Ohm coaxia It is perfect for outdoor use due to its excellent UV resistance and durability in direct-bury applications.

Specially suited for high-power amateur stations, RG provides a lower loss This is a robust coax "ribbon" cable approx 0. It is terminated in SO sockets and permits coax feed to be easily passed through a closed window or door.

This is standard double screened coax cable used for wiring to your satellite dish antenna. However, it is not suitable for ham radio use. Previous page You're on page 1 2 3 Next Page.

DX Engineering proudly announces our new, ultra-high quality, PL connector th Its always a good idea to buy quality cable from a reputable supplier and to read the specifications for that exact cable type. Not Yet Reviewed Loading Magnetic Loop. If your antenna SWR is already low and you wish to reduce feedline radiation and improve reception

Amateur antenna cable

Amateur antenna cable

Amateur antenna cable

Amateur antenna cable

Amateur antenna cable. Impedance mismatch of 75 Ohm Cable

All coaxial feedline cables will exhibit signal loss. The amount of loss is dependent on three factors, the construction of the cable, the frequency of the signal, and the feedline length. Balancing these variables is crucial in getting a solid signal out of your antenna system.

It is reasonably affordable and easy to work with. If your cable run is going to be longer than feet, or you are installing a UHF antenna for 70cm amateur radio, public safety, or GMRS; then I would recommend a low loss cable like LMR, Belden , or similar shielded low loss cables.

These cables have a heavier center conductor and an additional layer of shielding to better carry high frequencies with minimal loss. What about RG or RG-6 cables? These types of coax cables are commonly available and primarily used for cable TV installations.

But they are matched for 75 Ohm television systems and will have an extra loss factor when used on 50 Ohm radio communication systems. Feedline loss is measured in decibels Db per feet.

For example, if you have 6 db of feedline loss, your 50 watt signal coming out of the radio will be The good news is that if the antenna has 6 db of gain like the KB9VBR Slim Jim Antenna the signal will be multiplied so that as it exits the antenna, it will be near 50 watts again. To calculate your total losses or gains, you subtract the feedline loss and add the gains from the antenna.

The net result is your total gain or loss. When installing an antenna system, you greatest expense is usually in the feedline. A wise ham told me several years ago to never skimp on feedline, but instead install the best that you can afford. I want something that is fairly easy for me to mount, hook up, and use. My question is, how to set up the antenna ground system. I live in N. Florida and we have bad thunderstorms here. I plan to move in a couple of years to either N. Georgia mountains or to my childhood home in Kentucky western part.

Anyway, just curious as to how to set up an antenna ground. Thanks and Thanks for providing such a great resource. Your site has answered a lot of my questions. At home I plan to stick an ST3 antenna in the attic not quite ready to get into outdoor mounting and grounding, plus the wife is concerned about how it would look and run a feedline from there to the computer room where the scanner will live.

My question is, is there any point in spending the money for LMR to get good signal if all I really want is the MHz range or is that overkill. Again, great site; I appreciate the balance of real info with non-technical English! If you are on a budget and only need a 50 foot feedline run, then LMR may be overkill.

Other than 2mtrs and 70CM, I also like to listen to shortwave, police, fire and aircraft in the kHz, kHz and the MHz bands. Many thanks. The J-Pole antenna has broadband receive capabilities so it will work well as a scanner antenna over a wide range of frequencies. I think your Comet may have an edge on the UHF side as it is a true co-linear style antenna, but I feel both antennas will work equally well for your purposes.

I found this post while searching for information on RG8X feedline loss for 2M, and it was very helpful. Thanks for posting this helpful info.

Name Required. Email Required. Add me to your newsletter list. Checks and Money Orders. What People are Saying Beautiful. Works fabulously. Great product. Simple and effective. Not too shabby. Another method is to use a transformer. This method again only works for a particular frequency, but you will have enough bandwidth to still cover the 2 meter VHF band.

This value could be anywhere from. Put the sections inline like the diagram and do a final check with an antenna meter or analyzer. The biggest challenge in using 75 Ohm coax cable with your amateur radio setup is not the impedance, but attaching the connectors to the cable.

RG-6 and RG both have an aluminum shield material that can be quite difficult to solder. Attaching a PL connector to the cable, in the normal fashion by soldering the braid to the barrel of the connector will often result in a weak connection that will corrode or break in time.

That is, if you can get it soldered. What often happens is the dielectric of the cable starts to melt before the solder begins to flow. Available on Amazon. The F connectors are sturdy and reliable, the crimping process is designed for this style of cable. I have no problem with using 75 Ohm cable for HF applications and in certain applications for transmitters up to MHz. Cable coax seems to be just as well suited on the lower frequencies of the HF bands as does 50 Ohm coax.

But at the VHF range and beyond, I find the losses of the cable to be too great. I work for Directv and our coax is swept to mhz. We run a network on it that runs from 3mhz to mhz. But as you go up in frequency, the feed line will attenuate the signal. For example, at Mhz, RG-6 will have 2. You can use RG-6 to feed your 10 meter ground plane antenna. For 10 meters a half wave is about 16 feet, so to stay within that multiple, your cable should be 80 feet long.

Hi Michael. For many years I have been aware that the both the MOD and amateur communication equipment etc favour 50ohm coaxial cable feeds. We see numerous articles on both wideband and narrow band, straight forward. This would open up a great possibility for ohm twin feeder antenna systems etc.

Have you ever seen ohm twin feeder commercially availlable? I would love to hear if any ohm twin feeder exists, I have always nade my own. If 75ohm coaxial cable had been the standard there has always existed an easily available range of various ohm twin feefer cable to make up ohm feed lines and folded dipoles etc!

I use RG-6 on a 3-band 40, 20, 15 inverted vee with no problems. I also use it on a 2 m 3 ele quad and have no trouble hitting repeaters 50 miles with my UV5R5. Best of all the RG-8 was free. I encourage others to experiment with it.

I really enjoyed your article. In your opinion, would it be acceptable to use the 59, with the appropriate adapters and a tunable antenna to calibrate my SWR, or bite the bullet and get RG8? For 27Mhz, that would be Keeping your cable in multiples of that length will minimize losses due to the impedance mismatch.

I think, overall, you will have less loss if you use RG-6 cut to a half wave multiple than you would in using RG-8X cut to whatever length. I have reels, some really huge of RG I think eventually we will send it to state surplus auction.

Name Required. Email Required. Add me to your newsletter list. Checks and Money Orders. What People are Saying Beautiful. Works fabulously. Great product. Simple and effective. Very well built. Would buy again. Will recommend to friends.

First Name:. Last Name:. Email Address:. If you enjoyed this article, why not subscribe to our newsletter. You'll receive notification of future articles and special offers about once a month. Your email is safe with me as I don't sell or rent this list to any third parties. Impedance mismatch of 75 Ohm Cable RG and RG-6 are 75 Ohm coaxial cables designed for cable television applications, they tend to have wide frequency response and low line loss.

RG-6 connectors The biggest challenge in using 75 Ohm coax cable with your amateur radio setup is not the impedance, but attaching the connectors to the cable. Michael Martens March 19, at pm.

Hey, Which Coaxial Cable Should I Use? | Ham Radio aupetitchavignol.com

Forgot Password? The feed line also called the transmission line is the RF power conduit between your radio and your antenna. All the energy you generate travels to the antenna through the feed line. By the same token, all the signals picked up by your antenna must reach your radio through the same feed line. To complicate matters, all feed lines are not created equal. The amount of loss at any frequency will vary considerably from one type of feed line to another.

There is also insulating material between the center conductor and the shield. This material can be hard plastic, foam plastic or even air. A popular type of feed line for HF use is ladder line. Just remember that the higher the decibel number, the greater the loss.

Feed lines also have a characteristic impedance value measured in ohms. Coaxial cable commonly used for Amateur Radio has an impedance of 50 ohms while ladder line impedances can vary from to ohms. Amateur Radio transceivers are designed to work with an impedance of 50 ohms, so you must use 50 ohm coax, or find a way to convert the to ohm impedance of ladder line to 50 ohms.

If you are using an antenna that is designed to deliver a ohm impedance, it is best to use a coaxial feed line to provide a ohm antenna system impedance for your transceiver. The other approach is to use a device called an antenna tuner to transform the impedance of the antenna system to 50 ohms for your radio without physically adjusting the antenna at all.

An antenna tuner is a kind of adjustable impedance transformer. Some tuners operate manually; you twist the knobs until the SWR meter shows a SWR, or something reasonably close to it. Other tuners are automatic and do all the adjustments for you. Taking the antenna tuner approach is not a good idea when you are using coaxial cable under high greater than SWR conditions.

The tuner may provide the 50 ohm match to your radio, but the mismatch and high SWR still exists between the antenna tuner and the antenna! This translates to high losses in the coaxial cable. So which type of feed line should you use at your station? Fortunately, the answer is simple: You want the feed line that has the lowest loss at the highest frequency you want to operate. A little planning and common sense goes a long way when it comes to selecting feed line. As long as the SWR is low, the loss will be acceptable.

However, if you have an antenna that is feet from your radio and you are operating at, say, MHz, RG would be an extraordinarily bad choice!

For base stations in particular, always buy the lowest-loss coax you can afford. For instance, feet of LMR is overkill quality for a station that only operates on the meter band. Find A Class Use our class locator to find a class offered in your local area. Secure Site Login Forgot Password? Back to Top Having Trouble? Join ARRL. Donate Now. QST Get it here.

Amateur antenna cable

Amateur antenna cable