Sex drive in female ice users-Sex and Methamphetamine | SexInfo Online

Families and partners will often confide that their loved one is not only using ICE but that their sexual conduct has changed dramatically since they started using. Family members are quite understandably shocked and concerned. Sex becomes a compulsive need that cannot go unquenched. Our fantasy sex life can have little resemblance to our actual sex life. Performance anxiety, negative body image and general feelings of inadequacy are common.

Sex drive in female ice users

Sex drive in female ice users

Sex drive in female ice users

Sex Health. One woman who described methamphetamine as both numbing her feelings and enhancing her focus: it [meth] numbs you in order to focus on getting the Sex drive in female ice users done without feeling bad about yourself, or letting the trick [customer] make you dgive bad about yourself… being high kind of like numbs your emotions and, and just, you know, keeps me a little focused, like a painkiller. This hormone dosing regime mimics the ive rise in hormones that occurs during the estrous cycle and reliably induces female receptivity Todd et al. Figure 1. Some women described methamphetamine in instrumental terms, as a pleasure-increasing sex Maryland blowjob.

Bikini girl posters. ICE AND SEX: IT’S COMPLICATED

Quantitative data were summarized in a series of tables and cross-tabulations. When stimulant drug use and sex are strongly linked with one another, attempts to stay off the drugs are less likely to be successful if the client continues to engage in sexual behaviors previously associated with the drug use. These women felt they used the same preventative measures whether or not they were high on methamphetamine. Neither Rehabs. Methamphetamine use and risky sexual behaviors during heterosexual encounters. Rather, Sex drive in female ice users were many perceptions of the role of methamphetamine use on Sex drive in female ice users risk. Open in a separate window. In this framework, it is difficult to make room to document the potentially positive aspects of sexual behavior and drug use. Structural violence and clinical medicine. Sex was fun. I still can close my eyes and see the way he would look at me. Some perceived a link between unprotected sex and methamphetamine use, and acted to reduce Sharon acker slip risk. Aly Walansky. Any which way you can laughs. Please review our privacy policy.

The disinhibitory nature of methamphetamines makes them an appealing tool to aid sexual activities.

  • The intersection of drug use, sexual pleasure and sexual risk behavior is rarely explored when it comes to poor women who use drugs.
  • For me, when my bf and I were on meth, it was incredible!

The intersection of drug use, sexual pleasure and sexual risk behavior is rarely explored when it comes to poor women who use drugs. This paper explores the relationship between sexual behavior and methamphetamine use in a community-based sample of women, exploring not only risk, but also desire, pleasure and the challenges of overcoming trauma. Data were integrated for mixed methods analysis. While many participants reported sexual risk behavior unprotected vaginal or anal intercourse in the quantitative survey, sexual risk was not the central narrative pertaining to sexual behavior and methamphetamine use in qualitative findings.

Rather, desire, pleasure and disinhibition arose as central themes. Women described feelings of power and agency related to sexual behavior while high on methamphetamine.

Findings were mixed on whether methamphetamine use increased sexual risk behavior. The use of mixed methods afforded important insights into the sexual behavior and priorities of methamphetamine-using women.

Efforts to reduce sexual risk should recognize and valorize the positive aspects of methamphetamine use for some women, building on positive feelings of power and agency as an approach to harm minimization.

And sometimes I wish that I could have that sexual pleasure feeling forever. Rather, research regarding HIV and sexual behavior among female drug users is dominated by a risk-focused epidemiological paradigm which narrowly defines risk behaviors, measures their prevalence and explores the correlates of these behaviors e.

Vital knowledge has been gained about drug-using women and sexual risk behavior such as unprotected sex and multiple male partners using epidemiological methods S. Nevertheless, the common-sense notion of agency as a measure of individual empowerment and efficacy is valued by drug users and can be a powerful component of successful drug treatment P. The pursuit of pleasure is one arena in which feelings of agency may play out.

One explanation for this absence is the emphasis on pathological theories of drug use in the U. Similarly, drug-related needs — not pleasure or desire — are seen as the primary motivation for sexual engagement. In this framework, it is difficult to make room to document the potentially positive aspects of sexual behavior and drug use.

In addition, the widespread criminalization and social condemnation of drug use contributes to a research environment that rewards scientists for focusing on disease and risk, and provides little incentive to delve into areas like pleasure that appear vaguely disreputable, not to mention difficult to quantify and analyze Duff, The marginalization of desire and pleasure in HIV research may imperil our ability to develop effective prevention strategies.

To date, interventions to reduce sexual risk behavior among drug users, tested in randomized controlled trials, have been moderately successful at best. The lackluster showing of sexual risk behavior interventions suggests that we may be missing key information about sexual behavior among drug users, and that intensive efforts to date may not be pursuing a productive direction.

This paper explores the relationship between sexual behavior and methamphetamine use in a community-based sample of women who use drugs in San Francisco, CA.

Using mixed methods, it delves into different dimensions of sexual behavior and methamphetamine use — inclusive not only of the risk of unprotected intercourse, but of desire, pleasure and the challenges of overcoming trauma. Our goal was to understand sexual behavior as an experience rather than solely as a risk behavior.

By extending the boundaries of conventional HIV risk assessment; this research strives to bring new depth and insights to understanding the sexual behavior of women who use drugs. Rather, the two methodological approaches provide different perspectives on similar, but often not identical, issues.

Interpreting data using mixed methods requires active engagement in both views Ciccarone, , much like looking through the dual lenses of a pair of binoculars.

The study described here was designed to use mixed methods from its inception. Desire, pleasure and disinhibition arose as central themes relevant to sexual behavior and methamphetamine use, as well as to definitions of the self. Greene refers to the emergence of new concepts as a result of mixed methods analysis as initiation , the development of fresh insights and areas of inquiry Greene, Thus, in this paper, mixed methods served both the purposes of complementarity as planned and initiation as discovered.

Quantitative and qualitative data collection was conducted simultaneously from July — June in San Francisco, California. Participants were then given six coupons to recruit other methamphetamine-using women that they knew, and so on, using this process to build the quantitative sample. Eligibility was determined through a screening process that masked criteria by including several questions unrelated to eligibility. We also sought variation in sexual experiences and frequency of unprotected sex.

In the process of strategically targeted sampling, the research team met weekly to discuss emerging quantitative and qualitative findings regarding methamphetamine use and sexual behavior, and identified potential candidates for in-depth qualitative interviews. Similarly, as we began to note themes from qualitative findings, we selected participants and modified topics to further pursue our ideas, while simultaneously sampling strategically for the null hypothesis to control for potential subjective analytical bias and for potential distortions inherent to purposeful sampling Bourgois, The repeated interactions with study participants 1 interview, 2 counseling sessions, and 1 qualitative interview provided further opportunities to collect qualitative observations regarding institutional interactions and structural vulnerabilities, made in the form of field notes by study staff.

Following informed consent, open-ended interviews lasting 60—90 minutes were conducted using a topic-based interview guide. Topics included life history, family and intimate relationships, drug use history, sexual experiences and preferences, and methamphetamine use. Interviews were digitally recorded, transcribed and entered into Atlas Ti Atlas. In addition, we reviewed field notes by interviewers that summarized their observations and impressions from the quantitative and qualitative interviews, and counseling sessions.

Qualitative data collection reached the point of saturation at 34 interviews, as the research team noted the repetition of central findings with little new information arising. Quantitative data was used primarily to reveal the prevalence of different sexual behaviors and patterns of drug use.

In addition, perceptions of the impact of methamphetamine use on sexual behavior were examined using a standardized scale. Our overarching measure of sexual risk behavior was unprotected vaginal or anal sex with male partners. The identical question was asked regarding female partners. These items were followed with questions regarding the number of partners by type steady, casual and paying in the past six months.

Participants were asked about the use of several drugs, including methamphetamine, crack cocaine and heroin. Response categories are: strongly disagree, somewhat disagree, somewhat agree and strongly agree.

Values from 1—4 was assigned to responses in this order. Point prevalence data describing demographic characteristics and prevalence of risk behaviors obtained using SAS Version 9. To assess the similarity of qualitative subsample to the larger quantitative sample, we compared the two groups on a number of demographic, drug use and sexual behaviors Table 1.

For the SEMS subscale, means were calculated per participant and then combined for overall scores. Codes were then compared, expanded and refined to develop a working codebook.

Interview transcripts were entered into Atlas Ti and coded accordingly. Research team members discussed transcripts in monthly meetings, identifying key constructs, new themes and emerging findings, and modifying codes as warranted. In a second phase of analysis, the authors focused in on the relationship of sexual behavior and methamphetamine use.

Through the lens of this specific line of inquiry, transcripts were re-read and re-analyzed to cull the full range of data supportive, negative and null that described and helped illuminate the experience and meaning of sexual pleasure and desire in the context of risk-taking. Data were then grouped by theme e. Synthesis of qualitative and quantitative findings was an iterative process. Quantitative data were summarized in a series of tables and cross-tabulations.

Qualitative data were organized thematically. Topic areas were loosely defined and somewhat fluid, as findings rarely matched up neatly across paradigms P Bourgois, Data were integrated in order to add depth and richness to findings, rather than a directed effort at triangulation.

The full study sample consisted of women, of whom 34 participated in qualitative data collection. The qualitative subsample did not differ significantly from the rest of the sample in terms of demographic characteristics, frequency and modes of methamphetamine use or sexual behavior Table 1.

The sample was racially diverse, and over half of participants were age 40 or older. The mean days of methamphetamine use in the past month was The median number of male partners was 4 interquartile range 2, Interpretation of these findings is enriched by qualitative data which suggest a strong relationship between methamphetamine use and sexual desire.

In open-ended interviews, many participants described methamphetamine as creating an intense desire for sex. Levels of sexual activity were often attributed to methamphetamine use.

It [methamphetamine] definitely made - increased my libido, to put it nicely… So that part of it I enjoyed. The participant described an intensification of sexual desire directly related to methamphetamine use. In addition, methamphetamine use contributed to protracted sexual encounters, or marathon sex.

Over half of women reported engaging in marathon sex in the past 30 days table 2. Women described this practice as inherently linked to methamphetamine use. But never not high. This fostering of sexual desire is connected to the relatively high levels of sexual activity reported by participants. Women participating in the study described sexual pleasure as a key benefit of methamphetamineuse.

Methamphetamineuse facilitated sexual satisfaction: Many women felt their orgasms were better when using methamphetamine and some reported only having orgasms when high. Another dimension of pleasure was that sexual activity on methamphetamine was longer lasting. Being on meth, I…it, it prolonged the orgasming. Some women described methamphetamine in instrumental terms, as a pleasure-increasing sex aid. These findings suggest that a key reason women used methamphetamine was to enhance sexual pleasure.

The mean score on the scale was 2. A strong relationship between methamphetamine use, disinhibition and sexual pleasure was described by many women. Loss of inhibition was considered a positive experience that improved sexual encounters.

I do like the way it [methamphetamine] makes me feel sexually. Women described methamphetamine as promoting sexual exploration and freedom. You have sex for hours… nonstop, every position — every which way but loose laughs. Any which way you can laughs. Sex was fun.

I get real freaky. The loss of inhibition associated with methamphetamine use felt sexually empowering to some women. In addition to enhancing confidence, methamphetamine use allayed insecurities regarding body image for some participants. Another compared sex while not high to sex while high as follows:. This suggests a fluid relationship between the seeking of pleasure and avoidance of pain for some participants.

Here we are again. The median number of male partners was 4 interquartile range 2, Inner-city women and AIDS: the psycho-social benefits of unsafe sex. Thus, in this paper, mixed methods served both the purposes of complementarity as planned and initiation as discovered. I still had my suspisions SP but I thought that I was just having trust issues because of all we had been through.

Sex drive in female ice users

Sex drive in female ice users. A Look at the Research

.

The disinhibitory nature of methamphetamines makes them an appealing tool to aid sexual activities. As the quotes below indicate, ice is regarded as being particularly effective for this: "Ice is sex. Although it is particularly prevalent among gay men, it was also apparent among heterosexuals in other target audiences.

These included sex on site venues, local parks, and after-club house parties. Unsafe sexual and drug practices were claimed to be rampant in these places. A number of women in heterosexual relationships commented that they found methamphetamines not only useful for sexual enhancement, but also for relationships in general. We talk about things we'd never say to each other It's good for our relationship. Executive summary 2. Background to the research 3.

Research objectives 4. Methodology 5. Understanding the broad context of methamphetamine use 6. Specific types of methamphetamine users and behavioural contexts 7. Poly drug use 8. Sex and relationships 9. Information sources Risks and harm prevention Treatment and support services Developing targeted interventions Methamphetamine use among Indigenous communities.

Summary and recommendations Appendix A: Research instruments Appendix B: Reference list Popular Feedback Provide feedback If you would like a response please complete our enquiries form. Comments will be used to improve web content and will not be responded to.

Thank you for taking the time to provide feedback. It will be used to make improvements to this website. Sex and relationships Page last updated: February Table of contents Notes on the research List of tables and figures 1.

Feedback Provide feedback If you would like a response please complete our enquiries form. Comments Comments will be used to improve web content and will not be responded to. Enter the third , fourth and last digits of Submit feedback Privacy statement.

Sex drive in female ice users