How to protect sensitive plants-10 Easy Ways to Protect Plants from Frost | Dengarden

Even the hottest of desert climates can experience frost at some point during the year. If precautions aren't taken, nighttime temperatures dropping to freezing and below can damage trees and plants. For deserts within the United States, potentially harmful low temperatures may begin as early as November and continue through February or even March. If you take the time to prepare, your plants and trees can prevail after the lowest desert temperatures. The following tips will help protect your garden from frosty nights.

How to protect sensitive plants

If you prune in the fall you may cause damage to creep further down the stem. For larger plants like gardenia and tree ferns, drape coverings over the crown and wrap the trunk. If daytime temperatures are warm, open How to protect sensitive plants to allow air to circulate. Do not affix or gather your cover to the trunk, How to protect sensitive plants, Transexual cock pict panties this will prevent the heat radiating up out of the soil from reaching the plant. It's often a good idea to olants multiple layers of cloth or weatherproof paper, too still keeping the wrapping a bit loose. How do I protect my plants during a three day move that will see major temperature changes? And as always, share with your friends! Do not leave any openings for warmth to escape. Many plants can be sensitve resilient and might very well bounce back come springtime.

Long striptease mpegs. 10 Easy Ways to Protect Plants From Frost

The soil will trap the heat better wet than when it is dry, and evaporate slowly which warms the air around the plants. Cold weather How to protect sensitive plants protection can be as simple as a blanket. If left in freezing temperatures for long durations of time without much protection, plants How to protect sensitive plants easily die from desiccation. These kinds of plants are known as "hardy," because they can tolerate some Naruto igra of short-term freezing. Apply a layer of mulch. Don't Strand Plants Smart placement near other plants, benches, or walls—especially if these structures are south- or west-facing—will go a long way toward Bright eyes lover i dont plants from being damaged by frost. Avoid sowing seeds and bedding new plants in these low places. Image by Smoobs. Cardboard boxes are excellent for protecting plants. Keep in mind that any time there is a threat of frost, you need to take precautionary measures to protect tender plants from exposure to cold temperatures and subsequent damage. AY Abid Yasin Nov 23,

Jill volunteers at community gardens and learns about gardening through the MD Master Gardening and Master Naturalist programs.

  • Instructions: -- Cut off the canna leaves and put a label on the plant.
  • What do you do?

I have lived in a few different states and have covered my fair share of planting zones when it comes to gardening, and one thing they have all had in common is that there is always a little or a lot of winter preparation to consider as the seasons begin to change. Nothing is worse than having to cut back winter kill come spring, or trim broken branches due to snow and ice from favored woody perennials. Read on for some helpful winter preparation tips to ensure your plants make it through to warmer weather.

But zones 7 or lower are guaranteed to have a few good frosts through the winter months, with a good probability of scattered snow as well. If moving your pots is not an option, then wrapping your pots is your best choice as low as zone 5. Simply place a layer or two of bubble wrap around your plant, and then cover with burlap for an insulating layer that will keep the soil from freezing.

I personally also like to provide a good burlap covering over the top once it has gone truly dormant for an extra layer of insulation.

Feel free to combine any of the above suggestions as well to ensure plant survival. New within two years , or cold-sensitive palms opposed to cold hardy palms , need to be protected against temperatures that near or drop below freezing.

If you live in zones 8 or higher be prepared for a sudden frost or freeze as it is wont to do occasionally by having sheets or blankets you can warp around and drape over your plant. They dry quickly, insulate, and allow sunlight to reach your plant as well. Just be sure NOT to use any sort of plastic as they retain moisture close to the tree which can rapidly refreeze and cause further damage. Tropical plants are wimps in cold weather, and all it takes is a temperature drop below 40 and you are going to have trouble.

If you keep your tropicals outdoors, and you live in a zone that you know will drop below 40 degrees, then you need to keep a close eye on the temps in the spring when you first place them out, and again in the fall.

If you have planted your tropical in ground, chances are you already have left it in the pot and anticipated having to move it eventually, and now is the time to dig it up and either get it into a greenhouse, or indoors for the fall and winter months. Patio tropicals should be moved indoors as well.

If you can, tropicals ideally can be kept in a state of dormancy between 40 and 50 degrees in a darkened area until spring. But as temps drop, your need for protection rises. The easiest way to protect your hydrangea is to wrap a wire cage around the plant and fill it with mulch, or simply cover it with burlap or freeze cloth. If you are not worried about long lasting drops below 0 degrees, then you can consider simply mulching around the base of the plant, and wrapping the plant loosely in burlap.

Come fall, simply trim back your vine and move it indoors or allow it to go into a dormant state if you have an area that works well for this, as described above. Another mild climate vine growing in popularity, but which can withstand well into zone 5 if protected correctly, is the passionflower species. Passionflowers can die back or be trimmed back to the ground each year and will grow back profusely through the next season. In climates where natural die back occurs, be sure to mulch well over your roots to ensure less of a ground freeze.

Generally perennial vines zoned through a true winter climate can survive with very little to no winter preparation. Trimming and training is sometime best done once they have gone dormant, or come spring so you can also include any winter dieback that may have occurred; and no plant can suffer from having a good bed of mulch used around the base as long as it is pulled back again come spring.

These are also all factors to consider when prepping for the winter as they will keep the plant from becoming stressed and help get it through the coldest of the winter months in any climate. As the growing season winds down, be sure to keep your rose well watered approximately 2 inches per week , and stop fertilizing altogether. Come fall, allow the spent flowers to form rose hips, and refrain from trimming as this will signal a regrowth to begin on those branches.

In fact, do not prune until spring where you can also remove any winter damage that may have occurred. If you prune in the fall you may cause damage to creep further down the stem. This can be done in a few different ways: the easiest way is to hill, or mound, up loose dirt around the stem of the rose, and then cover with mulch and pine boughs.

Use this in conjunction with mounding of soil around the base of the plant, and be sure to keep cones well ventilated to keep from moisture and heat build up on sunny days. Tree roses can be protected in much the same way. Young trees and shrubs should be gathered together and tied loosely before being wrapped in burlap after the first frost to better keep from stressing the plant. A thick layer of mulch can also be added around the trunk as long as it is pulled back come spring. And remember to keep your vegetation well watered shortly after the first frost if soils are dry within the first 6 inches.

These concerns can show up as winter damage in a variety of ways, especially in harsh winter climates. Heavy snows and ice can also cause bending, twisting, or even breaking of branches and trunks- and upheavals of smaller trees if the canopy gets too heavy can occur. Salt is another factor to consider if you have vegetation near roads or walkways which receive a salting to help stave off ice slicks.

Salt runoff can damage plant trunks and stems, and evergreen foliage can be dehydrated or die off with too much exposure. If any of the above are a concern, gathering together your plant branches and wrapping with burlap, providing a healthy layer of mulch around the base of the plant, or frost clothes can provide all the protection you need to get through the worst of the weather each winter.

Plenty of mulch and the use of a cloche, or similar structure for larger plants, will generally provide enough protection to keep the roots from being damaged through the winter.

Fertilization is used for growth, which is not needed if you are allowing your plant to rest. Repotting should also wait until spring as well. You will also want to keep your plants away from any cold drafts near windows and doors. In the case of delicate vegetation, simple mulching and soil mounding can protect the bulk of your plant, and cloches or other structures can be used through the coldest months.

Burlap and bubble wrap are good to have on hand as well for both pots and certain plants, as well as for a little extra protection. I hope this was a helpful article and if you have any further suggestions, or questions, please comment below! And as always, share with your friends! Table of Contents. Related Posts. Backyard Boss is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.

To support our work we earn a commission if you purchase through some of the links listed above at no additional cost to you. This does not influence our opinions, but we believe in transparency so you can make informed choices.

Don't Strand Plants Smart placement near other plants, benches, or walls—especially if these structures are south- or west-facing—will go a long way toward protecting plants from being damaged by frost. I should have mentioned leaves. By continuing to use our site, you agree to our cookie policy. Unanswered Questions. Sky Woods.

How to protect sensitive plants

How to protect sensitive plants

How to protect sensitive plants

How to protect sensitive plants

How to protect sensitive plants

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There are often second hand tanks that go for cheap at lawn sales, especially if they have a crack. Thanks, kikalina! I need to get out and take some new pics now. Our crocuses are blooming and the daffodils are just about to open.

Can't wait! All the best, Jill. Hi purl3agony! Don't fret about the snow too much. Unless it was so heavy that it broke down your plants, snow will keep the ground warm and protect plants. Scrape it away, and you might see green underneath! It's hard frosts and thaws that do the real damage. Hi John! I should have mentioned leaves. I use them in our herb garden, which is away from the house, but not in the surrounding flowerbeds as they attract mice and, subsequently, ticks.

Nice to hear from you, John! Think I'll add your idea to the hub. We also use leaves to cover our plants. I have purchased old sheets at garage sales and use them as covers in case an early frost is in the air. Pinning this now, but wish I had studied this before our first snow last week : I'll be ready for next year :. Very informative hub.

I love gardening and you have wonderful tips here. Thanks for writing and share with us. Voted up! In light of the snow we just had!!! You do such a great job with your images and always well-written. Thank you. Thanks, Peggy! I well remember how warm it was all year long when I lived in Texas. I actually missed the cold weather and would have given anything for a good snow.

Still, sometimes I'd like to be able to grow tropical plants outside. I well remember those snowbound days when living in Wisconsin. We just use old sheets. I'll be able to wash them up soon and store them in our shed for next winter. Your tip of watering before a freeze is valid. Even fruit grove owners do that to help protect their crops.

Good hub! Up, useful, interesting and will share. Beautiful photos! Thanks for your comments, Glimmer Twin Fan! I updated this to improve the layout and add a few new pictures.

Covering, uncovering, racing around--whew! Spring can be a wild ride for gardeners! Saw this on pinterest and had to read. Written before I joined hubpages. This is great for me. Last spring we covered and uncovered a dozen times. Especially my peonies. This is really useful. Taking my daughter to the busstop this am I saw my snowdrops poking through the ice.

Gave me hope that spring is on it's way. Oh, no! Another snowbound gardener. I'm sure you are sick of the cold. Thanks for reading! Enjoyed your hub. We still have to much snow will be awhile before we can start planting. Wow, and I thought we had it bad here in MD, where a snowstorm is supposed to hit us again on April 1. Hope you see green soon! Other product and company names shown may be trademarks of their respective owners.

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HubPages Inc, a part of Maven Inc. As a user in the EEA, your approval is needed on a few things. To provide a better website experience, dengarden. Please choose which areas of our service you consent to our doing so. Choose Cold-Hardy Plants Some vegetables and flowers are hardy souls that thrive in spite of or sometimes because of the cold. There are also a wide range of tasty edibles that are resistant to frost, including broccoli cabbage calendula pot marigold carrots chives lettuce leeks peas radish spinach Swiss chard Experts at your local nursery are great sources of information about hardy plants appropriate to your zone.

Which plants are sensitive to frost? Tender plants such as avocados, fuchsia, bougainvillea, begonias, impatiens, geraniums and succulents Edibles such as citrus trees, tropical plants, tomatoes, pumpkins, sweet potatoes, cucumber, okra, eggplant, corn, and peppers Spring-blooming shrubs and trees such as cherry, azalea, and rhododendron Tender perennials like canna, elephant ear, caladium, and dahlia.

Don't Strand Plants Smart placement near other plants, benches, or walls—especially if these structures are south- or west-facing—will go a long way toward protecting plants from being damaged by frost. Place Plants in Frost-Resistant Spots It's as true for plants as it is for real estate: location, location, location.

What is frost? Avoid Frost Pockets Frost pockets are depressions in the ground. Check the Ground-Level Temperature Temperatures higher up may vary from those lower to the ground.

Harden Off Seedlings Before setting out seedlings, acclimate them to the outdoors by gradually exposing them to conditions outside. After two weeks, the seedlings will be stronger, sturdier plants, ready for transplanting.

What can I cover my plants with to protect them from frost? Protect Plants With Cloches Strictly speaking, cloches are removable glass or plastic covers that protect plants from cold. Keep Cloches Staked Down Stake lightweight cloches into the ground to prevent them from blowing over. Warm Plants With Water Jugs Fill plastic milk jugs with water and place them in the sun, allowing them to soak up heat during the day. Water Before a Frost It may sound crazy, but watering around plants the night before a spring frost can actually protect them from freezing.

Ground Hanging Baskets Place hanging baskets on the ground before covering them so they can benefit from heat rising up from the soil. Bring Potted Plants Indoors When frost is predicted, bring planters and hanging baskets inside. Wrap Fruit Trees If you grow fruit trees, be sure to wrap the trunks in the fall with burlap strips or tree wrap. If necessary, this wrapping can be left on for the majority of the winter season. Frequently Asked Questions Here is some additional information regarding questions frequently asked about how to protect your plants from frost: What factors affect the chances that a plant will die from frost?

Humidity: Higher humidity raises the dew point and helps slow the rate of temperature change, decreasing the likelihood that frost will form on your plants. This explains why dry deserts can shift from high heat to freezing cold so quickly. Soil properties: The sun warms the soil during the day, and this heat then radiates out into the cooler atmosphere of the night. By contrast, thin, sandy, or nutrient-poor soil will not release as much moisture. What are the different kinds of frost and what do they mean?

Ice forms on the inside of the plant, which causes plant cells to burst. Fruit blossoms and semi-hardy plants will suffer extensive damage and potentially death. Even root-hardy perennials will be hurt. What are the first and last frost dates for my area? What do I do if I see frost damage?

Should I prune frost-damaged growth? It is definitely not advisable to begin pruning frost-damaged growth until the spring for a variety of reasons: Those damaged limbs and leaves will continue to trap heat within the canopy and help the plant make it through the winter. Damage is often not as bad as it may seem at first glance, and new growth may yet still emerge out of an area you might have thought was already dead.

Pruning damaged limbs might stimulate new growth from your plant, and that new growth will be especially susceptible to frost as well as your entire plant. What doesn't help protect plants from frost?

It also sucks in cold air from surrounding areas that could make the ground temperature even colder for your plants. Mulching: Though this can be of temporary help for situations such as trying to keep your deciduous fruit tree from prematurely breaking dormancy, it not only prevents the soil from capturing heat from the sun but also blocks much of that heat from rising up from that soil to help warm your plant.

If you do decide to use mulch for a short cold period, be sure to remove it once the danger of frost is over. How do you protect plants from frost? By covering them. With water. Works Cited Bradley, Lucy , April.

Frost Protection. University of Arizona Extension. Retrieved on 19 October Mason, Sandra. University of Illinois Extension. Brown, Faith. How to Protect Plants from Frost. Day, Julie. Today's Homeowner. Questions must be on-topic, written with proper grammar usage, and understandable to a wide audience. Answer: Pansies planted in the fall will last all winter into spring in Zones 6 and above. Helpful 5.

Question: I have a patio shade that goes all the way down to the floor. Answer: It sounds like it. Helpful 4. Question: Can I use the chard in my garden after a deep frost? Answer: Swiss chard is a frost-hardy plant, and cold weather will actually improve its flavor. Helpful 2. Garden Pest Control. This is a great article by the way, and has helped me with my biomimicry project! Will water my wildflowers tonight and pray they will be ok!

Thanks for commenting, Gregg and Lily! Hope your plants are doing well. I found your inventions of the jugs are extremely useful. Thank you for sharing What about using propane heaters, like the old 'smudge pots'?

We have a freeze warning Hi ytsenoh. Good timing, huh? Stay warm--and thanks for reading! Still a foot of snow in the backyard, nothing peeping out yet, good tips here, though. Sign In Join. Connect with us. This website uses cookies As a user in the EEA, your approval is needed on a few things.

Ice forms on the outside. Will likely only significantly harm or kill tender plants. This is used to identify particular browsers or devices when the access the service, and is used for security reasons. This is used to prevent bots and spam. This is used to detect comment spam. This is used to provide data on traffic to our website, all personally identifyable data is anonymized.

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This is used for a registered author who enrolls in the HubPages Earnings program and requests to be paid via PayPal. No data is shared with Paypal unless you engage with this feature. The first takes place at night, when temperatures dip to their lowest.

Cold air sinks below warm air, so the lowest part of a garden is usually the coldest. Frost causes water within the plant's cells to freeze, the first half of the damage. The second step takes place when the sun rises and hits afflicted plants, defrosting them all at once and rupturing the cell walls. Frost damage is identified by blackened plants or distorted growth, especially if stalks become limp; leaves may even become translucent.

Not all frost damage is immediately evident; sometimes plants with frost-damaged roots show damage a few days or weeks after the initial frost. These plants are unable to efficiently draw water through their roots and may eventually die from lack of moisture.

Avoid planting frost sensitive plants in the lowest areas of the garden; these areas become the coldest and should be reserved for hardier plants. In the early and late parts of the year when frost is around the corner, avoid applying nitrogen-rich fertilizer to frost sensitive plants.

This type of fertilizer encourages new growth like leaves, which are tender and especially susceptible to frost damage. When there is a frost warning of any kind, ranging from light to hard killing frost, cover sensitive plants with old blankets or apply a thick layer of manure, old leaves or straw to the ground around the plant to prevent the soil itself from freezing, which will then prevent the plants' roots from freezing.

Daniel R. Mueller is a Canadian who has been writing professionally since Mueller's writing draws on his extensive experience in the private security field.

How to protect plants from frost - Marin Master Gardeners

Jill volunteers at community gardens and learns about gardening through the MD Master Gardening and Master Naturalist programs. Yep, that's spring—a magical time of year filled with burgeoning life and fluctuating thermometers. For many of us, spring presents one of the year's greatest gardening challenges: protecting tender new growth from damage due to cold.

Frost damage, freezing death, root damage, and frost cracks on bark are four primary negative effects of severe drops in the temperature.

In early spring, when the threat of frost is especially great, closely monitoring weather conditions via weather radio, TV, and websites for reports of expected cold spells is imperative. That way, when frost is predicted, you can prepare for it. It's also a good idea to periodically check the temperature at ground level near your plants to see how cold it is for them and whether or not you need to do something about it.

This article will explain what frost is, how freezing temperatures affect plants and what you can do about it. It will also provide easy and effective suggestions for protecting plants from frost, methods that can be applied to tender food crops like tomatoes and citrus trees, delicate potted plants like succulents and begonias, as well as other plants susceptible to extreme cold.

Read on to find out how to protect your green friends from frost damage, freezing temperatures and the cold hands of winter. Some vegetables and flowers are hardy souls that thrive in spite of or sometimes because of the cold. These kinds of plants are known as "hardy," because they can tolerate some amount of short-term freezing.

By contrast, plants that are killed or severely injured by freezing temperatures are known as "tender. Crocuses often push their way through snow to bloom, and a spring storm rarely gives narcissus, tulips, grape hyacinths, or pansies pause. There are also a wide range of tasty edibles that are resistant to frost, including.

Experts at your local nursery are great sources of information about hardy plants appropriate to your zone. Tender perennials like canna, elephant ear, caladium, and dahlia. Before a killing frost, consider digging these plants up and storing them in a dry, cool place.

Smart placement near other plants, benches, or walls—especially if these structures are south- or west-facing—will go a long way toward protecting plants from being damaged by frost.

It's as true for plants as it is for real estate: location, location, location. Set out seedlings and store-bought spring plants in areas that are less likely to experience damaging cold. As cold air moves to lower ground, it will pass by plants located on high ground or slopes.

That's why it's best to place seedlings and other plants that are susceptible to frost in these elevated locations. Placing plants by benches, fences, and walls—particularly if they are south- or west-facing—can provide additional protection, especially if the structures are dark in color. During the day, the structures absorb heat. Throughout the night, they radiate that heat, keeping plants warmer than they'd otherwise be.

Nearby shrubbery also provides protection from light frosts. Frost generally occurs on clear and calm nights, where there are few to no clouds to reflect warmth back to the ground and little to no wind to disperse warmer patches of air. The cold air then settles down to the lowest point, while the hot air rises up and away from the ground. On these nights, frost can happen even if the temperature on your thermometer does not read below freezing.

This in turn disrupts the movement of fluids within the plant, depriving its tissues of water and drying it out. This is why leaves damaged by frost shrivel up and turn dark brown or black.

If left in freezing temperatures for long durations of time without much protection, plants can easily die from desiccation.

Note: Frost can also occur when there is wind, but it is a chilling wind that then brings in even colder air, making matters worse. Frost pockets are depressions in the ground. Cold air drains into these "pockets," and it can't get out. When this happens, plants located in the depressed areas can suffer frost damage. Avoid sowing seeds and bedding new plants in these low places.

Temperatures higher up may vary from those lower to the ground. Before setting out seedlings, acclimate them to the outdoors by gradually exposing them to conditions outside. Begin the hardening off process about 14 days before transplanting. At night, bring them indoors. No matter what type of cover you use, make sure that it extends down to the soil on each side.

Do not leave any openings for warmth to escape. If you can, it's also advisable to use stakes to keep material, especially plastic, from touching the foliage. Do not affix or gather your cover to the trunk, however, as this will prevent the heat radiating up out of the soil from reaching the plant. See diagram below for proper covering. In the morning, after the frost has thawed, remove the covers. A row of sticks with newspaper, cardboard, or sheets and towels tented over them will do just fine.

This too will prevent heat loss. Strictly speaking, cloches are removable glass or plastic covers that protect plants from cold.

Like other covers, cloches should be placed over plants before the sun goes down and removed in the morning after the frost has thawed. Glass cloches are highly ornamental. When you're not using them outside for frost protection, you can use them indoors over humidity-loving houseplants like violets. You can also use plastic cloches, which are generally less expensive than glass ones.

But because they are lightweight, they must be staked into the ground to prevent them from blowing away in high winds. Note: Since cloches used for cold protection are temporary measures, you may opt to create your own makeshift versions. Flower pots, Mason jars, baskets, and milk jugs with the bottoms removed can all be placed over plants to shield them from freeze and frost. Fill plastic milk jugs with water and place them in the sun, allowing them to soak up heat during the day.

Before dusk, set the jugs around your plants and throw a cover over them. It may sound crazy, but watering around plants the night before a spring frost can actually protect them from freezing. During the night, the wet soil will release moisture into the air, which will raise the temperature and keep plants warmer. Place hanging baskets on the ground before covering them so they can benefit from heat rising up from the soil. When frost is predicted, bring planters and hanging baskets inside.

They'll reach lower temperatures, too. That's why potted plants are especially susceptible to root damage due to cold. It can cause their roots—particularly those near the edge of the pot—to turn spongy and black.

Although root damage may not kill the plant, it will stunt its growth. Just make sure when you bring potted plants inside that they don't have any insects or pests on them and aren't currently suffering from any diseases. This will not only potentially exacerbate the problem, but it could also infect your other plants. If you grow fruit trees, be sure to wrap the trunks in the fall with burlap strips or tree wrap. Tree wrap will prevent this splitting, which is known as frost crack.

It's often a good idea to use multiple layers of cloth or weatherproof paper, while still keeping the wrapping a bit loose. You should also extend the wrapping all the way to the ground and at least as high up as the lower limbs or branches. See diagram below for proper technique. Here is some additional information regarding questions frequently asked about how to protect your plants from frost:.

The following table breaks down the different kinds of freezes and frosts, as well as the potential effects for plants exposed to even a few hours of freezing temperatures:.

The last frost date in the spring and the first frost date in the fall indicate how long your growing season will be. You need to know these dates so that you can determine when to start seeds indoors and when to purchase and plant nursery plants. For freeze and frost dates in the U. Just because you see frost damage does not necessarily mean you need to take any drastic action.

Many plants can be surprisingly resilient and might very well bounce back come springtime. Your best bet is to wait until the weather begins to get warmer again usually around March and see if any new leaves sprout. It is definitely not advisable to begin pruning frost-damaged growth until the spring for a variety of reasons:. Only once new growth has sprouted from your plant in the following spring should you begin to prune dead or damaged limbs.

Pansies planted in the fall will last all winter into spring in Zones 6 and above. I believe some varieties do well in the colder zones as well.

The leaves of ours sometimes darken due to hard frost, but no, your pansies should do fine without protection. I believe there's a picture of one of ours in the article above in bloom through spring snow.

I have a patio shade that goes all the way down to the floor. Can it help protect my plants from frost? It sounds like it. Would your plants be covered on all sides? If not, you might want to give them a good watering and cover them lightly with newspaper, a sheet, or Reemay if you have it.

Swiss chard is a frost-hardy plant, and cold weather will actually improve its flavor. Temperatures under 15 degrees, however, will kill it.

If you're expecting temps that low, you should cover it with something like Reemay. Sign in or sign up and post using a HubPages Network account. Comments are not for promoting your articles or other sites.

How to protect sensitive plants

How to protect sensitive plants